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No Free Parking: The Curious History of London's Monopoly Streets

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Lots of quirky stuff and fantastic quotes plus also some hugely thought-provoking big picture stuff about how London has grown in the way that it has. In a city of rags and riches, where folk hero Dick Whittington believed the streets were paved with gold, anything could happen - and everything has. The author’s love of London and its history are infectious - reading his evocative descriptions will send you (and your children) out exploring, looking up at the face of buildings and imagining what was once there.

Unfortunately we cannot offer a refund on custom prints unless they are faulty or we have made a mistake. If you're a fan of Peter Ackroyd books or want to know more about London streets, then you may enjoy this. Boys Smith is one of Britain's leading public intellectuals on architecture and urbanism, championing a revival of street-based traditional urbanism against the 'traffic modernism' of the twentieth century. And because everyone else has forgotten how dreary the world’s most famous board game is, and is too stuffed with turkey and trimmings to do anything else, we meekly acquiesce. All in all, a good and interesting book that I will be keeping on my shelf in case I need to refer back to it.

From the Roman and Celts marching along the ancient Old Kent Road, to the rattling newspaper presses of Fleet Street, the game of Monopoly has painted London’s story across cheerful coloured tiles. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. This is a clever way of publicising the author's worthy and important crusade for London's heritage and against ill-thought planning authority proposals. From the Roman and Celts marching along the ancient Old Kent Road, to the rattling newspaper presses of Fleet Street, the game of Monopoly has painted London's story across cheerful coloured tiles. To take London’s Monopoly streets as a starting point for an evocation of London urbanism is a witty conceit but it also provides a solid anchor for any constructive understanding of how we human beings live in our streets.

No Free Parking starts with a brief introduction to how the London Monopoly streets were most likely chosen, before tackling each street (and utilties and rail) one by one.He has lectured internationally, written for the Spectator, Evening Standard, Times, Sunday Times, Telegraph and Guardian, and been interviewed across TV and radio.

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